(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "NightRider"

241

" Well, I don't know," he said,

" Oh, just everything. And I'm not the only person feels
that. Other people do, too. They have the same impression."

" I reckon nobody's sure most of the time/' he rejoined.

The landscape about them was very empty, and the sky,
The bare fields, corn stubble, tobacco stobs, or brown pasture,
lay along the road; along the fencerows the trees were leafless
now; the wood along the horizon looked blue and smoky.
The horse's hoofs made a hard, chipping sound on the pike.
Once or twice they heard a crow cawing from somewhere
back in the fencerows. They met no one on the road.

After a long silence, she said, " If you're chilly, you'll find a
laprobe hi the back."

"Are you?"

" Not really," she answered.

"I'm not, either," he asserted, "or not very." But he
reached back to get the robe. She lifted the reins, and he
spread the robe across her knees and drew it up to her waist.
At that moment, she turned her head and looked him directly
in the eyes, " Thank you," she said.

That night she had come to his room, for the first time.

She was, it seemed to him, two persons. There was the
person who came to his room, and stood with one finger to
her lips while she gently pushed the shadowy white door shut
behind her; and there was the person whom he saw moving
about the house in the daytime, talking casually and easily
to him or to her father or to Benton Todd, or humming a
tune under her breath. The two persons seemed quite distinct
to him. With the first were associated all the small night
noises, melancholy, exciting, and insidious, which worked
upon his consciousness while he lay waiting for her, some-
times in vain, and staring at the door, or while she lay beside
him—the sound of a mouse gnawing dryly and minutely in
the wall, the hoot of an owl in the woods or the distant
barking of a dog, very faint and hollow, the unnamable,
hushed creakings of old joists and beams. With that person
he talked only hi whispers, for if Ms voice rose she would

16